What affect does Sugar have on the human body?

December 17, 2020

Even natural simple sugars found in fruit and honey should not make up more than 15% of the daily calorie intake. Because sugar is added to almost all processed foods, most people consume far too much sugar.

Why is Sugar SO Bad For You?

Why is Sugar SO Bad For You?

Why is Sugar SO Bad For You? Diabetes is one of the many reasons.

It is known that:

  • Sugar suppresses the immune system
  • Sugar is addictive
  • Sugar contributes to hyperactivity and anxiety
  • Sugar causes depression, affects concentration, increases mood swings
  • Sugar elevates harmful cholesterol
  • Sugar causes hypoglycemia
  • Sugar weakens the immune system against infection
  • Sugar increases the risk of heart disease
  • Sugar slows the body's uptake of calcium and magnesium
  • Sugar increases blood glucose to harmful levels
  • Sugar promotes tooth decay
  • Sugar produces increased stomach acidity
  • Sugar raises adrenaline levels in children
  • Sugar causes weight gain and obesity
  • Sugar contributes to diabetes
  • Sugar contributes to osteoporosis
  • Sugar contributes to cardiovascular disease
  • Sugar contributes to hypertension
  • Sugar causes changes in the kidneys and liver
  • Sugar increases fluid retention
  • Sugar cause hormonal imbalances
  • Sugar cause headaches

Why is sugar added to almost every form of processed and pre-packaged food we purchase?

If you do consume too much, reducing most of the sugar from your diet will have significant health benefits. For instance - you will lose weight simply by cutting sugar out of your diet wherever possible.

Consuming sugar raises the insulin level in the blood stream. Constantly fluctuating insulin levels then promote the storage of fat in the body, which in turn increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. Increased insulin levels suppress the immune system and white blood cell function thereby reducing the body's ability to fight disease. Insulin levels can also interfere with calcium and magnesium absorption into the body.

Why is sugar added to almost every form of processed and pre-packaged food we purchase?

Why is sugar added to almost every form of processed and pre-packaged food we purchase?

Reducing your sugar consumption will help you lose weight, and stay healthier than you've ever been.
Try it for just one month, and you'll discover what we already know. It's not enough to cut out saturated fats from your diet. You need to reduce sugar, in all it's forms, as well.

The body obtains most of its sugar requirements from carbohydrate rich foods like bread, pasta, rice, potato and seeds as well as other simple sugars in fruit and honey. This means that we need little, if any, additional sugar at all.

Depending somewhat on activity levels, age, height and gender, the average recommended daily intake of calories is around 1200, and this must include the calories we consume in the form of refined sugar.
Every teaspoon of sugar contains 20 calories, so it is important to know how much sugar is in the processed and pre-prepared foods eaten. Some common food selections have massive amounts of sugar, but the amount only begins to make sense to us when converted into teaspoons, a quantity most people are familiar with.

It may also help to know that it takes at least 30 minutes of moderate circuit training exercises to burn around 150 calories - meaning that jelly donuts will require a 60 minute workout to stop it adversely affecting your blood sugar and your overall health.

Now, check out the delicious, but deadly delights below.

 

Bad Foods For You With Sugar

Cherry Pie

150g = 420 calories = 21 teaspoons of sugar
Over one third of the average recommended daily intake

Chocolate Chip Cookie

Each cookie = 85 calories = 4 teaspoons of sugar

 

Iced Cupcake

40g = 140 calories = 7 teaspoons of sugar

 

Lemon Meringue Pie

150g = 380 calories = 19 teaspoons of sugar
Over one quarter of the average recommended daily intake

 

Jelly Doughnut

70g = 325 calories = 16 teaspoons of sugar
Over one quarter of the average recommended daily intake

Iced Doughnut

70g = 325 calories = 16 teaspoons of sugar
Over one quarter of the average recommended daily intake

Tea With Sugar

Cup of tea = 2 calories
Two cubes of sugar = 40 calories = 2 teaspoons

Fig Biscuit or Spicy Fruit Roll

Each biscuit = 65 calories = 3 teaspoons of sugar

Apple Pie

150g = 420 calories = 21 teaspoons of sugar
Over one third of the average recommended daily intake

Can or Bottle of Beer

375ml bottle/can = 140 calories = 7 teaspoons of sugar

 

Chocolate Covered Doughnut

70g = 325 calories = 16 teaspoons of sugar
Over one quarter of the average recommended daily intake

 

Frozen Yogurt

100g = 120 calories = 6 teaspoons of sugar

 

Glass of Sweetened Orange Juice

250ml = 118 calories = 6 teaspoons of sugar

 

Granola Bar

50g = 250 calories = 12 teaspoons of sugar

 

Honey

Contains simple sugars that should also be consumed in
moderation as with fruits.
1 teaspoon = 20 calories

Ice Cream Sundae

1 sundae = 320 calories = 16 teaspoons of sugar

 

Jelly Beans

Lollies and sweets are pure sugar.
Every jelly bean = 20 calories = 1 teaspoon of sugar

Blueberry Muffin

75g = 310 caloies = 15 teaspoons of sugar
Over one quarter of the average recommended daily intake

 

Cola, Soft Drink or Soda

250ml = 160 calories = 8 teaspoons of sugar

Strawberry Thickshake

Large thickshake = 500 calories = 25 teaspoons of sugar
Almost half the average recommended daily intake

Swiss Roll

42g slice = 180 calories = 9 teaspoons of sugar

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